Leadership Teacher
Home About Participate Library Affiliates Sponsors Application
Discussion Groups

Discussion Groups

Chat


Spotlight
Teacher's Toolbox:
Snowball activity
Teacher's Toolbox
Teacher's Toolbox:
Mirror The News
Teacher's Toolbox
Teacher's Toolbox:
Resource Scarcity Game/Project
Teacher's Toolbox
Teacher's Toolbox:
Career Cluster Introduction
Teacher's Toolbox
Teacher's Toolbox:
Teacher-to-Teacher Journal
Teacher's Toolbox
Teacher's Toolbox:
Power Point Emotions
Teacher's Toolbox
Teacher's Toolbox:
Vocabulary Graphic Organizers
Teacher's Toolbox


Stryker Biotech Summary

Upper Valley Biotechnology Day 11/13/2008

Before last Thursday, little did we know that Stryker Biotech knows how to grow human bone. It is a company tucked away in the Lebanon Airport Office Park. And what they do does, indeed, change lives.

We began our day with a wonderful overview of the company and some of the science behind OP-1 (Osteogenic Protein #1). The Director of Manufacturing Sciences had a knack for explaining things in just the right way so that all the teachers sitting in the room could understand. She told us the story of the drug, from the original idea to its current production. We learned about cell cultures, purification, microfiltration. We then heard from Quality Assurance scientists, and donned white coats and goggles while touring their labs. The care they must take to ensure sterile environments, and the degree to which monitoring occurs every step of the way were mind-boggling. Technicians took us through the manufacturing process and described the work they do. Some of us enjoyed trying our hands at (no pun intended) the automated hand-washer.

Lunch was delicious: Italian dishes, healthy salads, yummy cookies. As we ate, we chatted with many of the Stryker employees. Josh, who holds a Bachelorís degree in Biology and works in Process Validation, is passionate about lab-based work. Jennifer graduated from Salve Regina, then Endicott College with a Masterís in Accounting, and she is a cost accountant. As the lone financial person in the facility, she enjoys the challenge, and acts as a liaison with the financial folks at the company Headquarters in Hopkinton, MA. Sarah is working on her MBA at Franklin Pierce, and works in Human Resources. She described and explained the reasoning behind the intense interview process at Stryker. In her words, by the time a potential employee completes the process, he or she already feels and is perceived to be part of the team. Amy works in the Quality Control lab, and strongly believes that her participation in team sports were essential to her success at Stryker, because working there is all about teamwork. Emily currently works in Plant Services, specifically in metrology. From what I understand, thatís all about making sure equipment that measures things works properly. Justin has a Chemical Engineering background and works in Operational Excellence. He is happy to work for a smaller company after having worked for Pfizer. He attributes his success in and passion for his work life to his high school Chemistry teacher who made him do fun, hands-on things and inspired passion in her students. That made all of us feel good! Tamsen graduated from Colby Sawyer and is a production Tech. Her degree is in Environmental Science, and she feels lucky to have this job. She sees herself there for many years. Jen, who oversees Quality Assurance activities, has a Masterís degree in Biochemistry, and feels that her work experience in Clinical Research prepared her well for this job. Patrick stole the show. He grew up in Windsor, VT and chased a girl to California, then chased her back to Vermont. Many years and two children later, the chase is over, and he is happily married to the same girl. He appreciates his job at Stryker. In his words, you get what you give back. Last, but by no means least, Erika, a Hanover High grad with a Fine Arts degree from the Maine College of Art, was the person behind the scenes who made our day run so smoothly. She coordinated everything, including the wonderful lunch, and to her we extend our thanks.

We culminated our day with an article sharing, Teacherís Tool Box, and a round-the table reflection. Intrigued when we heard about it at the Leadership Kickoff, Toni shared an article about Appreciative Inquiry. Lorelea taught us an activity called ďI HaveÖWho HasĒ that was great fun, and Angie taught us all about using Harry to break the ice.

In a nutshell, three paragraphs to sum up our day.

First: Wow.

Second: We were amazed. We were dumbfounded by the timeline, and now understand why drugs cost so much. One billion dollars, and ten years later, the OP-1 implant has been approved for, and is used to treat non-union fractures. Each vial, or dose, costs $5,000. After spending the day at Stryker, we all thought that was a bargain.

Third: We were inspired. We met people who are utterly devoted to excellence. Who are absolutely dedicated to what must be very stressful work. Some drive 90 miles to get there every day. I canít speak for everyone else, but I was humbled, big time.

Thank you, to everyone at Stryker for opening my eyes to a branch of science I did not previously understand, and for giving me a glimpse of what you do. As you are inspired when you meet people whose bones have healed and who can now walk because of your drug, I, too, am inspired by your sincere, tireless dedication to your good work.


<-Back

Back to top

Member Login
Email Address:
Password:
Forgot your password?

Spotlight
Business Article:
NEW TO LT? REGISTER NOW: For LT I 2010-2011, LT's Signature Real World Professional Development Workshop (Optional: Earn 6 Graduate Credits from PSU)
Business Article
Business Article:
NEW: Register Now for LT II's Competitive Community-Based Action Research Challenge for K-12 Educators--Prize Money and Optional 6 Grad Credits from PSU
Business Article




Copyright ©2003 Leadership Teacher
Phone: 603-715-5515   Fax: 877-744-5517   e-mail us at: info@leadershipteacher.org